Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think


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Not registered? Forgotten password Please enter your email address below and we'll send you a link to reset your password. Not you? Forgotten password? Forgotten password Use the form below to recover your username and password. The book ends with a look at September 11 and its likely ripples that will continue for some time.

One of the aspects of this book that makes it so worthwhile is the fact that the author focuses on aspects of life and death, and shows a real interest in the ordinary people whose lives were affected by war. He comments on the reason why it remains important for war to be studied--and at times practiced--by societies that would rather dwell at peace with others. The author demonstrates that the seeming chance effects of warfare can have dramatic effects, cutting off people from having children and passing on a family line, destroying civilizations by crippling their population base, showing the way that tactics and technologies can be used to kill and destroy, and demonstrating the way that the horrors of war can lead to dramatic changes in the lives of those who survive, killing some, shrouding others in immortal glory, and ruining the reputations of others, even in ways that are somewhat unjust.

Sometimes battles are deeply unfortunate in their outcomes, even when the outcomes are kind for some of the people involved specifically. Sep 14, Scottnshana rated it did not like it. This book started off as a distinct pleasure. Battles really are the wildfires of history, out of This book started off as a distinct pleasure. Battles really are the wildfires of history, out of which the survivors float like embers and then land to burn far beyond the original conflagration.

Like the first case study, the remaining two are about maneuver and its influence on victory in battle. The discussion of other personalities at Shiloh and their far-reaching influence in its wake—i. I had actually scrawled in the margins that with the passage of time, someone should bring this scholarly model to evaluating the effects of Fallujah or Anaconda, perhaps with better maps and interviews of the combatants as older, more seasoned, and reflective men. It his here, however, that he disappoints. Relativism sometimes convinced them that they were not that much different from their enemies.

To go further, any military leader who is not consistently evaluating and adapting to circumstances—a quality Hanson himself describes in his examination of Sherman—is dangerous to himself and his subordinates. I admire Lincoln as much as any well-read American, but I also acknowledge that he had doubts and made several mid-course corrections in his endeavor to preserve the United States of America.

The back-handed swipes at President Clinton [like Truman, Hanson has decided to avoid mentioning him by name], his implication that every veteran is a national security expert, and his bizarre segue into scorn for modern art reveal more than a little of the Manichaeanism he mentioned earlier. This premature assessment of the Global War on Terror is akin to trying to change the tire on a car that is still in motion, a practice likely to bring both danger and failure, and certainly different than assessing events that happened before To use another metaphor, I left this book feeling like I had engaged in an intelligent and interesting conversation with a brilliant and engaging scholar; when it was time to say goodbye, I would have liked to shake hands and say I looked forward to future engagements.

I feel as if I was offered a palm streaked with something sticky and putrid. Needless to say, I will not be purchasing future conversations with Victor Davis Hanson. Mar 18, Ramon4 rated it really liked it Shelves: own , non-fiction , history , read Interesting and entertaining book that examines the after-effects of three major battles. Victor Davis Hanson is a great writer and it is a joy to read his insights.

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However, in this book, his choices of battles is problematic. He picks one relatively unknown Greek battle in Delium BC. He tries hard, but the only lasting effect is that Socrates fought in the battle and did not get killed. The world of Western intellect would be vastly different if Socrates did not survive.

Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think

The other battle he Interesting and entertaining book that examines the after-effects of three major battles. It was the largest use of state-sanctioned suicide, and it failed. Hanson concludes that implies that the current use of suicide bombers is likewise doomed to failure. I found the third battle the most interesting and I recommend this book just for the insights on Shiloh. The lessons learned by Grant and Sherman formed how the remainder of the Civil War was to be fought, and determined how the American Army still views warfare.

But what I found most interesting is the story of a Union general who was blamed for the carnage of Shiloh. A young and up-coming officer, his reputation was ruined, and he never reached the potential he seemed headed for. However, in his efforts to clear his name, he became a good writer. After the Civil War, he would write countless articles attempting to justify his actions at Shiloh. He continued to do this long after people stopped caring about the errors of a young one-star general. Having polished his writing skills, he turned to writing novels, and became the first American author to write a best selling novel to the masses of Americans.

His novel was presented on stage in all major American cities, and held the record for the most performances of any American play for over 30 years. It was one of the first novels to be filmed, and the adaptation set records for tickets sold, money generated, and number of Academy Awards won. While this man is not as well known today as he was fifty years ago, when he is remembered, he is remembered as an author, and not for anything that happened at Shiloh. Dec 21, J. Purves rated it liked it Shelves: own.

Ripples of Battle

I was surprised at how interesting of a read this book was. Hanson weaves a number of fascinating stories and characters together in ways that illustrate ideas about war and culture that we have today. Some ideas and experiences of today were fought over in BC at Delium, with a hoplite infantryman, Socrates, fighting in the ranks of the phalanx.

How many of you know what part the author of Ben Hur had to play at the battle of Shiloh?


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Hanson will tell you. He also makes a passionate argument that no discussion of suicide bombers, or an appropriate Western response towards them, can ever be intellectually adequate without a knowledge of the WWII battle of Okinawa. I'm convinced. All in all, an informative book of history written by a very good story-teller. Nov 27, Ryan rated it it was ok.

Decent overall and a quick read. The introduction and sections on Okinawa and particularly Shiloh are quite good. The third section, on Delium, is clearly the weakest and most speculative. He spends quite a few pages speculating about the form of post-Delium-Socrates-less Western philosophy and it just felt like a total waste of my t Decent overall and a quick read. He spends quite a few pages speculating about the form of post-Delium-Socrates-less Western philosophy and it just felt like a total waste of my time.

Shelves: borrowed-ebooks. Three not unknown, but certainly not well-known battles: Okinawa , Shiloh and Delium BC The author takes us through the far-reaching effects from various aspects of these battles. I stood amazed at the connections made across, decades, centuries and millenia from each of these battles that effected political decision making and strategy, popular culture, western philosophy, military tactics, and more. Although it helped reading this book with a moderate understanding of military Three not unknown, but certainly not well-known battles: Okinawa , Shiloh and Delium BC Although it helped reading this book with a moderate understanding of military and world history, the author lays out his case for each battle and the associated connections for all readers from the neophyte to the old hand.

Aug 08, Salty rated it really liked it. He explains the tactics involved and some of the major personalities, mostly generals, of each battle and how they helped shape the future of war and society. I found each of the three battles interesting from a historical perspective in and of themselves as well as Hanson's explanations of their impact.

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He spends a little too much time hypothesizing about what might have happened had the people and outcomes been different. Towards the end of the book he ties some of the books teachings to the September 11, attack on the USA and the subsequent military response or war on terror. Very thought provoking. Jan 23, Al rated it really liked it. Four and a half stars. Hanson, one of the great military analysts and writers of our time, has produced a gem here. He describes and analyzes three epic battles of different ages Okinawa, Shiloh, and Delium and then shows in detail how each of them influenced the future of the participants, and of warfare techniques and strategies, in ways not fully understood by other historians and analysts.

I would have rated this book a solid five starts, but I felt that there was a little too much redund Four and a half stars. I would have rated this book a solid five starts, but I felt that there was a little too much redundancy. That said, Hanson's analysis and insights are brilliant and I highly recommend the book to anyone interested in war and its impact on civilization. Feb 04, Blaine Welgraven rated it it was amazing.


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They simply wash up on us all as we speak and in ways that cannot fully be known until centuries after we are gone. Enlightening Nearly every paragraph effects ones thinking in profound ways.

Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think
Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think
Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think
Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think
Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think
Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think
Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think
Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think
Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think Ripples of Battle: How Wars of the Past Still Determine How We Fight, How We Live, and How We Think

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